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Phylogeny of gracillariid leaf‐mining moths: evolution of larval behaviour inferred from phylogenomic and Sanger data

Overview of attention for article published in Cladistics, October 2021
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

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22 tweeters

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4 Mendeley
Title
Phylogeny of gracillariid leaf‐mining moths: evolution of larval behaviour inferred from phylogenomic and Sanger data
Published in
Cladistics, October 2021
DOI 10.1111/cla.12490
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xuankun Li, Ryan St Laurent, Chandra Earl, Camiel Doorenweerd, Erik J. Nieukerken, Donald R. Davis, Chris A. Johns, Atsushi Kawakita, Shigeki Kobayashi, Andreas Zwick, Carlos Lopez‐Vaamonde, Issei Ohshima, Akito Y. Kawahara

Abstract

Gracillariidae is the most taxonomically diverse cosmopolitan leaf-mining moth family, consisting of nearly 2000 named species in 105 described genera, classified into eight extant subfamilies. The majority of gracillariid species are internal plant feeders as larvae, creating mines and galls in plant tissue. Despite their diversity and ecological adaptations, their phylogenetic relationships, especially among subfamilies, remain uncertain. Genomic data (83 taxa, 589 loci) were integrated with Sanger data (130 taxa, 22 loci), to reconstruct a phylogeny of Gracillariidae. Based on analyses of both datasets combined and analyzed separately, monophyly of Gracillariidae and all its subfamilies, monophyly of the clade "LAMPO" (subfamilies: Lithocolletinae, Acrocercopinae, Marmarinae, Phyllocnistinae, and Oecophyllembiinae) and relationships of its subclade "AMO" (subfamilies: Acrocercopinae, Marmarinae, and Oecophyllembiinae) were strongly supported. A sister-group relationship of Ornixolinae to the remainder of the family, and a monophyletic leaf roller lineage (Callicercops Vári + Parornichinae) + Gracillariinae, as sister to the "LAMPO" clade were supported by the most likely tree. Dating analyses indicate a mid-Cretaceous (105.3 Ma) origin of the family, followed by a rapid diversification into the nine subfamilies predating the Cretaceous-Palaeogene extinction. We hypothesize that advanced larval behaviours, such as making keeled or tentiform blotch mines, rolling leaves and galling, allowed gracillariids to better avoid larval parasitoids allowing them to further diversify. Finally, we stabilize the classification by formally re-establishing the subfamily ranks of Marmarinae stat.rev., Oecophyllembiinae stat.rev. and Parornichinae stat.rev., and erect a new subfamily, Callicercopinae Li, Ohshima and Kawahara to accommodate the enigmatic genus Callicercops.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Researcher 1 25%
Unknown 2 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 25%
Unknown 3 75%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2021.
All research outputs
#1,970,077
of 19,695,594 outputs
Outputs from Cladistics
#71
of 621 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,302
of 390,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cladistics
#6
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,695,594 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 621 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 390,580 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.