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Repeated mass strandings of Miocene marine mammals from Atacama Region of Chile point to sudden death at sea

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
41 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
195 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Repeated mass strandings of Miocene marine mammals from Atacama Region of Chile point to sudden death at sea
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.3316
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas D. Pyenson, Carolina S. Gutstein, James F. Parham, Jacobus P. Le Roux, Catalina Carreño Chavarría, Holly Little, Adam Metallo, Vincent Rossi, Ana M. Valenzuela-Toro, Jorge Velez-Juarbe, Cara M. Santelli, David Rubilar Rogers, Mario A. Cozzuol, Mario E. Suárez

Abstract

Marine mammal mass strandings have occurred for millions of years, but their origins defy singular explanations. Beyond human causes, mass strandings have been attributed to herding behaviour, large-scale oceanographic fronts and harmful algal blooms (HABs). Because algal toxins cause organ failure in marine mammals, HABs are the most common mass stranding agent with broad geographical and widespread taxonomic impact. Toxin-mediated mortalities in marine food webs have the potential to occur over geological timescales, but direct evidence for their antiquity has been lacking. Here, we describe an unusually dense accumulation of fossil marine vertebrates from Cerro Ballena, a Late Miocene locality in Atacama Region of Chile, preserving over 40 skeletons of rorqual whales, sperm whales, seals, aquatic sloths, walrus-whales and predatory bony fish. Marine mammal skeletons are distributed in four discrete horizons at the site, representing a recurring accumulation mechanism. Taphonomic analysis points to strong spatial focusing with a rapid death mechanism at sea, before being buried on a barrier-protected supratidal flat. In modern settings, HABs are the only known natural cause for such repeated, multispecies accumulations. This proposed agent suggests that upwelling zones elsewhere in the world should preserve fossil marine vertebrate accumulations in similar modes and densities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 195 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 3 2%
Brazil 3 2%
Chile 2 1%
Argentina 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 176 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 17%
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Master 30 15%
Student > Bachelor 29 15%
Other 19 10%
Other 37 19%
Unknown 12 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 43%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 55 28%
Environmental Science 20 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Chemistry 2 1%
Other 11 6%
Unknown 18 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 449. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2021.
All research outputs
#35,238
of 18,353,936 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#77
of 8,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#344
of 195,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,353,936 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,968 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.