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A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
44 news outlets
blogs
12 blogs
twitter
189 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
wikipedia
13 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America
Published in
PLoS ONE, March 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0092022
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew C. Lamanna, Hans-Dieter Sues, Emma R. Schachner, Tyler R. Lyson

Abstract

The oviraptorosaurian theropod dinosaur clade Caenagnathidae has long been enigmatic due to the incomplete nature of nearly all described fossils. Here we describe Anzu wyliei gen. et sp. nov., a new taxon of large-bodied caenagnathid based primarily on three well-preserved partial skeletons. The specimens were recovered from the uppermost Cretaceous (upper Maastrichtian) Hell Creek Formation of North and South Dakota, and are therefore among the stratigraphically youngest known oviraptorosaurian remains. Collectively, the fossils include elements from most regions of the skeleton, providing a wealth of information on the osteology and evolutionary relationships of Caenagnathidae. Phylogenetic analysis reaffirms caenagnathid monophyly, and indicates that Anzu is most closely related to Caenagnathus collinsi, a taxon that is definitively known only from a mandible from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta. The problematic oviraptorosaurs Microvenator and Gigantoraptor are recovered as basal caenagnathids, as has previously been suggested. Anzu and other caenagnathids may have favored well-watered floodplain settings over channel margins, and were probably ecological generalists that fed upon vegetation, small animals, and perhaps eggs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 189 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 5%
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 64 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 22%
Researcher 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Student > Master 7 10%
Other 7 10%
Other 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 45%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 25 34%
Unspecified 5 7%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 586. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,828
of 12,923,198 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#244
of 139,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130
of 188,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#14
of 4,770 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,923,198 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 139,868 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,772 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,770 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.