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A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
50 news outlets
blogs
12 blogs
twitter
54 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
28 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
162 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy
Published in
Nature, September 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13762
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anil C. Seth, Remco van den Bosch, Steffen Mieske, Holger Baumgardt, Mark den Brok, Jay Strader, Nadine Neumayer, Igor Chilingarian, Michael Hilker, Richard McDermid, Lee Spitler, Jean Brodie, Matthias J. Frank, Jonelle L. Walsh

Abstract

Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 87 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 33%
Researcher 19 21%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 4%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 76 84%
Engineering 3 3%
Chemistry 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Unknown 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 539. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#25,206
of 18,090,383 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#2,771
of 81,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223
of 216,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#41
of 945 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,090,383 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,017 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 91.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 945 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.