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Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1318678111
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Kistler, A. Montenegro, B. D. Smith, J. A. Gifford, R. E. Green, L. A. Newsom, B. Shapiro

Abstract

Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) was one of the first domesticated plants, and the only one with a global distribution during pre-Columbian times. Although native to Africa, bottle gourd was in use by humans in east Asia, possibly as early as 11,000 y ago (BP) and in the Americas by 10,000 BP. Despite its utilitarian importance to diverse human populations, it remains unresolved how the bottle gourd came to be so widely distributed, and in particular how and when it arrived in the New World. A previous study using ancient DNA concluded that Paleoindians transported already domesticated gourds to the Americas from Asia when colonizing the New World [Erickson et al. (2005) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102(51):18315-18320]. However, this scenario requires the propagation of tropical-adapted bottle gourds across the Arctic. Here, we isolate 86,000 base pairs of plastid DNA from a geographically broad sample of archaeological and living bottle gourds. In contrast to the earlier results, we find that all pre-Columbian bottle gourds are most closely related to African gourds, not Asian gourds. Ocean-current drift modeling shows that wild African gourds could have simply floated across the Atlantic during the Late Pleistocene. Once they arrived in the New World, naturalized gourd populations likely became established in the Neotropics via dispersal by megafaunal mammals. These wild populations were domesticated in several distinct New World locales, most likely near established centers of food crop domestication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
New Zealand 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
Sweden 2 2%
Argentina 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 85 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Master 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 25 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 63%
Social Sciences 10 10%
Environmental Science 7 7%
Arts and Humanities 6 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Other 8 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 160. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2016.
All research outputs
#82,442
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,016
of 79,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,482
of 244,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#58
of 940 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 940 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.